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File-Sharing URIs

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GNUnet (currently) uses four different types of URIs for file-sharing. They all begin with "gnunet://fs/". This section describes the four different URI types in detail.

Encoding of hash values in URIs

Most URIs include some hash values. Hashes are encoded using base32hex (RFC 2938).

Content Hash Key (chk)

A chk-URI is used to (uniquely) identify a file or directory and to allow peers to download the file. Files are stored in GNUnet as a tree of encrypted blocks. The chk-URI thus contains the information to download and decrypt those blocks. A chk-URI has the format "gnunet://fs/chk/KEYHASH.QUERYHASH.SIZE". Here, "SIZE" is the size of the file (which allows a peer to determine the shape of the tree), KEYHASH is the key used to decrypt the file (also the hash of the plaintext of the top block) and QUERYHASH is the query used to request the top-level block (also the hash of the encrypted block).

Location identifiers (loc)

For non-anonymous file-sharing, loc-URIs are used to specify which peer is offering the data (in addition to specifying all of the data from a chk-URI). Location identifiers include a digital signature of the peer to affirm that the peer is truly the origin of the data. The format is "gnunet://fs/loc/KEYHASH.QUERYHASH.SIZE.PEER.SIG.EXPTIME". Here, "PEER" is the public key of the peer (in GNUnet format in base32hex), SIG is the RSA signature (in GNUnet format in base32hex) and EXPTIME specifies when the signature expires (in milliseconds after 1970).

Keyword queries (ksk)

A keyword-URI is used to specify that the desired operation is the search using a particular keyword. The format is simply "gnunet://fs/ksk/KEYWORD". Non-ASCII characters can be specified using the typical URI-encoding (using hex values) from HTTP. "+" can be used to specify multiple keywords (which are then logically "OR"-ed in the search, results matching both keywords are given a higher rank): "gnunet://fs/ksk/KEYWORD1+KEYWORD2".

Namespace content (sks)

Namespaces are sets of files that have been approved by some (usually pseudonymous) user --- typically by that user publishing all of the files together. A file can be in many namespaces. A file is in a namespace if the owner of the ego (aka the namespace's private key) signs the CHK of the file cryptographically. An SKS-URI is used to search a namespace. The result is a block containing meta data, the CHK and the namespace owner's signature. The format of a sks-URI is "gnunet://fs/sks/NAMESPACE/IDENTIFIER". Here, "NAMESPACE" is the public key for the namespace. "IDENTIFIER" is a freely chosen keyword (or password!). A commonly used identifier is "root" which by convention refers to some kind of index or other entry point into the namespace.